Screen Time & Social Media 101

Screen Time & Social Media 101

Learn the good news and the bad news regarding social media. This workshop is designed to provide the tools and vocabulary you need to help your children make wise choices and to understand the consequences of social media.

In this workshop you will learn:
 •  Social Media vocabulary
 •  Typical guidelines for social media and screen time
 •  Parent oversight options
 •  Good and bad outcomes of social media today
 •  How to discuss social media issues with your children

The numbers don’t lie

According to recent studies 88% of American 13-17-year-olds have a smartphone, and 90% of these teens use their phone four or more times per day to access the Internet.

On average, teens send more than 30 text messages per day. This does not include messages sent via Facebook, Whats App or Twitter.

More than 60% of teenage girls and 40% of teenage boys have accounts on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat or Tumblr, and the vast majority of these teens have all four.

Pre-teens, ages 8-12, currently have less access; however these numbers are on the rise. More than 50% of pre-teens have a smarphone, and the same percentage of pre-teens with access has one or more social media accounts.

How much do you know?

As parents, how much do you know about social media and how this affects your kids?

There is an entire new vocabulary in the pre-teen/teen world today. Ghosting, icing, SMH, GOAT, YouTubed, Tweeted, Snapped It, selfie, Insta-queen and more. With a new vocabulary comes new dangers, new pressures, new anxieties, and levels of concern and consequences that were not present a parenting generation ago.

The Internet and Social Media have opened up access for kids in ways never previously imagined. While there are positives, from Googling for research papers to online college applications and the ability to communicate with friends and family around the world with ease, the potential for consequences is alarming.

  • Kids/Teens today have shown a dramatic decrease in social skills with peers, adults, teachers and community members.
  • Bullying, and most specifically cyberbullying, has risen drastically among teens with terrible consequences for self-esteem, anxiety and depression. This has led to an increase in teen suicide and gang violence.
  • As parents often have limited access or knowledge of a teen’s social media activity, law enforcement officers at one’s home are now often a parent’s first indicator that there is an issue.
  • Teens are bombarded constantly with images, text, and comments. This has caused a shift in brain development and activity. Kids are requiring more stimulation for any type of arousal to occur and struggle with school, down time, play time, reading, art and extracurricular activities.

Want to learn more about social media and its effects? Want to have professional guidance on ways to set boundaries, have conversations and parent in this new age world?

For more information about our workshops, please review our Parent Workshops page or contact us with your questions and ideas.